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November 27, 2014, 11:51:20 PM
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 1 
 on: November 25, 2014, 02:57:09 PM 
Started by Jamni90 - Last post by C_A
I'm sure heredity is part of the picture, but I feel it's a complex interplay between genetics and environment - there was a huge argument some years ago among scientists and early-education teachers and theorists about whether it was "nature" or "nurture" that mostly affected childhood development; they seem to have come to the common-sense conclusion, "both."

I shall add "et cetera" to this SOLELY for abbreviative reasons, not meant to disparage or demean the rest of this magnificent post.

Was I born into a family with "gifts"?  Yes, I was.  Was I chosen, of the children of my generation, to be shown the ways of those gifts?  Yes, I was.  But it was up to me to take of that knowledge.

There are times when this can only be explained within the confines of a "cultural" or "ethnic" manner.  Sometimes scientifically, sometimes anthropologically, sometimes religiously and other times just by "say so".

The resounding, and yet unquantifiable issue here is that it is, indeed, a QUEST, not a "gimme".

 2 
 on: November 25, 2014, 02:23:35 PM 
Started by Jamni90 - Last post by Alchymist
I'm sure heredity is part of the picture, but I feel it's a complex interplay between genetics and environment - there was a huge argument some years ago among scientists and early-education teachers and theorists about whether it was "nature" or "nurture" that mostly affected childhood development; they seem to have come to the common-sense conclusion, "both."

This is how I see it. Most newborn children come fully equipped with what I call the Questing Gene (which probably isn't exactly a "gene" as such, but it's a useful shorthand). Young children are interested in everything. Kids learn language and motor skills at a phenomenal rate in their first two or three years, constantly picking things up, sticking their fingers in things, taking things apart, asking all kinds of questions and driving their parents bonkers. If they're lucky their parents, siblings, relatives and friends encourage this insatiable curiosity with books, storytelling, music, art, whatever.... if they're unlucky it's a matter of "Don't bother me, I'm busy", or "We don't do that" or "Don't ask stupid questions" - or, perhaps worst of all, "Don't be stupid, you can't do that."

It takes a very, very strong-minded kid to survive that kind of squelching, and most seem to be thoroughly conditioned into accepting whatever they're told by about the age of five. Behaviour, religious and political views, opinions regarding scientific and artistic and philosophical questions, become solidified into dogma, which it is very difficult, even impossible, to break free from.

Those of us who were lucky, or strong-minded, as young children, survive into adulthood with the Questing Gene intact, always wanting to know more, experience more, see what lies over the distant hills or across the far ocean; some, a resilient few, manage to break free of their early conditioning in adulthood; all of these are the ones who become creative artists, real scientists, explorers, designers, musicians, craftspeople - and, of course, occultists and Witches.

So, altogether, very much a matter of luck, it would seem. The moral of this story seems to be - choose the right family to be born into.

Blessed Be all you Questers out there. keep learning; ask questions, even stupid-sounding ones; shine a light into dark corners and see what scuttles out; turn over rocks and see what wriggles. Explore; read, read, read, whether scientific journals or "Wicca for Dummies"(!) or ancient eldritch lore from mouldering old tomes. And create! Whatever it is! Poetry, paintings, knitting, blacksmithing, spells, rituals......

Alchymist.

ps. Just noticed that this post is my 333rd, which must have some kind of occult significance.....

 3 
 on: November 25, 2014, 11:54:47 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by C_A
Wild turkey with as much home-grown or wild harvested food as we can arrange has been the "order of the day" here for several years. 

That aside, I think that Thanksgiving is an odd holiday.  It's the first one in the year that can bring us joy and / or pain.  The memories, good AND bad, of past "turkey days" flood in like nearly no other time of year.

 4 
 on: November 25, 2014, 05:56:14 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by Ashe Isadora
Spinach lasagna is delish anytime.  My husband is lobbying for turkey taco's this year and it sounds fine to me. Abundance and gratitude are the key things here.

 5 
 on: November 25, 2014, 03:24:48 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by oldghost
Also enjoy Thanksgiving . Not a big fan of turkey so it's spinach lasagna for me . May you all enjoy yours and the company of your families and friends .

 6 
 on: November 23, 2014, 07:35:58 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by SierraKumou
Thanksgiving is probably my favorite holiday. My whole family on my mom's side gets together and my siblings and cousins and I sit at the "kiddie table" and spend the whole meal teasing each other. The best part for me, though, is that it's a tradition we'll always have, no matter who goes to college, or get married, we always come together to eat a ton of food!

 7 
 on: November 23, 2014, 06:04:52 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by Aunt Thora
Thanksgiving is a good time for us.  My family likes to take the time and look back on the blessings received and check over what is still needed through the year.  And Yes by all means if possible give.  My favourite thing is to share a big dinner with family and friends.  My favourite one was when we had about 36 people for Thanksgiving dinner.  So much food.  This year will be spent with my little family.   

 8 
 on: November 22, 2014, 11:58:43 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by Draconis Rex
Thanksgiving is primarily an American and Canadian thing, it's not something we celebrate in this country (UK). I respect it though and I respect what it originally stood for. I don't really know what else I can say about it.

 9 
 on: November 22, 2014, 11:04:46 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by MoonlitWings
I enjoy getting together on Thanksgiving..well normally its just me, my mom, brother, and sister, but still, family time! I'm quite glad I'm not working. Even though we won't be cooking this year, going to a buffet, so at least I will be able to enjoy Thanksgiving dinner out with my family. Next year hopefully we can cook, then I can make some vegan dishes to share! We most likely will be donating some food this year again as well. Give what you can to help others, right? :)

 10 
 on: November 22, 2014, 10:25:41 AM 
Started by Ashe Isadora - Last post by Ashe Isadora
Me  too.  And I make sure the neighborhood stray cats and my own dog from a rescue organization get some turkey.  It just feels good to acknowledge that being able to share is a luxury and a privilege for the giver as well as the recipient.
Though the tie-in is tenuous I'm also grateful for the religious freedom, such as it is, that we have.

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