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Spiritual Connection => Talking Stick => Topic started by: Firesong on June 20, 2012, 12:54:06 PM

Title: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on June 20, 2012, 12:54:06 PM
The chanupa wakan, Lakota for sacred pipe, is an important part of American tribal culture.  It’s a means of showing respect for the natural order of things, and in offering prayers to the creator, which are carried to Wakan Tanka on the smoke, by the spirit of the tobacco plant, one of the four sacred herbs. 

Sometimes tobacco only is smoked, and at other times, knick-knick (from the Algonquian word for “mixture”), traditionally a mixture of red willow bark, tobacco and other herbs.  Some are personal pipes, and others are used for large ceremonies.  A pipe is not owned, but carried.  It is too sacred for ownership.

About Pipestone

One of the most sacred and spiritual areas in North America is located near the town of Pipestone, MN, at the Pipestone National Monument, where the pipestone, or catlinite, a form of fossilized clay, is quarried.  It has always been a place of peace, where all people, regardless of tribal affiliations, put down their weapons of war.  It is considered hallowed ground, and only those who were purified in ceremony could set foot there.  It was limited to men only, because they were the ones who quarried the stone. 

Here, small quarries are worked by individuals, and families, often for generations, to obtain the sacred pipestone for making the chanupa wakan.  By federal law, it can only be quarried by Native Americans, using hand implements and the process is exceedingly arduous, and time-consuming.  In a new quarry, it can often take two months or more simply to reach the pipestone.  The sacred stone is covered with eight to ten feet of quartzite, the second hardest mineral on earth, and its removal, as well as the final extraction of the pipestone is an art which has been perfected over time by those who quarry the sacred stone. 

While Catlinite is found in other locations, only that which is quarried in the sacred quarries at Pipestone is considered suitable for making the chanupa wakan.  One reason is the stone’s working characteristics.  Pipestone is from the sacred quarries is soft enough to be worked with files, pocket knives and hack saws.  Catlinite from other regions, and even that obtained in other quarries in close proximity to Pipestone tends to be too hard or brittle, and lack consistent workability.

The quarry area is also the place where the thunderbird lays her eggs, and approaching  the nest of the thunderbird is a very dangerous thing, and many have been swept away by ferocious storms and lightning.  There are many ancient petro glyphs in the area, and hundreds of years ago, the tribal people would gather there to wait for the thunderstorms, before quarrying the stone.  If no storms came, the stone would not be quarried.

The Sacred Pipe

The sacred pipe has two parts; the bowl, traditionally made of Catlinite, and the stem, made of wood (usually sumac or ash, but may be almost any wood).  There are many different shapes for pipes but the most prevalent are the calumet, which is shaped like an upside down “T”, and the elbow pipe which is, as its name suggests, as simple “L” shape. While the bowl and stem are kept together, they are never joined except for ceremonial use, because when they are put together, they become a living altar; the union of male and female; the joining of the earth, our mother, and the sky, our father. 

While there are degrees of commonality in almost all pipe ceremonies, there are also many differences which make them unique, and any two ceremonies, even by members of the same tribe, will rarely if ever be exactly the same because the rote memorization of prayer is very uncommon among the People, and different traditions may use different colors for the cardinal compass points, and/or begin with a different direction. 

The common theme is the filling of the bowl while addressing of each of the cardinal points in turn, rotating in a clockwise direction. At each point, a pinch of tobacco taken from the pouch is held in one hand, and the pipe, its stem pointed outward in the direction being addressed, in the other.  A small amount of tobacco is dropped to the ground, to remind us of our connection to Mother Earth, and the rest loaded into the bowl, as a prayer is offered.  After the four cardinal directions have been addressed, the bowl is pointed at the ground, and again, tobacco is sprinkled, and a prayer is offered to Mother Earth while the rest of the pinch is loaded into the pipe, and the stem is pointed at about a forty-five degree angle and the action is again repeated, this time addressing Father Sky.  Finally, the stem is pointed straight up, tobacco sprinkled, and prayers offered to Wakan Tanka, the Creator, as the last bit of tobacco is loaded into the bowl. 

If the pipe has been filled for use in an inippi, or sweat lodge, the bowl will typically be covered with a sage leaf, and the pipe will be placed on a mound of earth, or if it is a calumet, often the tip is pushed into the ground, with the stem pointing up at an angle, in front of the opening to the sweat lodge, and smoked when the inippi is concluded. 

If it is to be smoked immediately, it would then be lit, and passed in a counterclockwise direction as each person in turn takes a puff or two, and passes the pipe to their left.  When the pipe had made one complete trip around the circle, the last person in the circle may finish the last few bits of tobacco in the pipe, or they may elect to hand it to another person in the circle who possibly smokes tobacco other than in ritual.  When the tobacco is gone and the pipe goes out, it is cleaned carefully, with the ashes being returned to the earth, taken apart, and stored very carefully.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Bri on June 20, 2012, 08:34:55 PM
That was interesting I enjoyed reading that, do they still do that to this day?
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on June 21, 2012, 08:31:47 AM
That was interesting I enjoyed reading that, do they still do that to this day?

Yep... it's a very important of Indian spiritual practices.  I've participated in several pipe ceremonies, and each one was a very personal and enriching experience.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Serpentium on June 21, 2012, 09:29:31 AM
Excellent piece FS. I can see how the pipe commands such respect as a tool, and thinking about it, so it should. Underestimating the power of such pipes has now resulted in worldwide tobacco addiction, and brings a whole new dimension to drugs like Opium, Cocaine, or Meth.

Even without any spiritual element involved, turning a powerful plant or substance into smoke and inhaling it. exerts a severely underestimated influence upon people's consciousness and in the Western World, this influence manifests as addiction every time. Humans seem to have a propensity for inhaling smoke. Maybe a genetic imperative for consciousness expansion. Very thought provoking piece.         
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on June 21, 2012, 01:47:36 PM
Excellent piece FS. I can see how the pipe commands such respect as a tool, and thinking about it, so it should. Underestimating the power of such pipes has now resulted in worldwide tobacco addiction, and brings a whole new dimension to drugs like Opium, Cocaine, or Meth.

Even without any spiritual element involved, turning a powerful plant or substance into smoke and inhaling it. exerts a severely underestimated influence upon people's consciousness and in the Western World, this influence manifests as addiction every time. Humans seem to have a propensity for inhaling smoke. Maybe a genetic imperative for consciousness expansion. Very thought provoking piece.       

Thanks Serp!
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 21, 2012, 04:59:31 PM
The formality of the ritual has great dignity to it. And a sense of continuance. From an indigenous perspective, I admire NA societies greatly for the ways in which they've preserved and passed down the sacred aspects of their cultures. I noted it too when I was in New Zealand. How much more connected to culture and ritual the indigenous peoples there are. How much more of it has been included in the national psyche for all.

So  much of ours has been lost to time. The Uncles and Aunties who do know are so often not in contact with the younger generations. Our languages are all fragmented. There is not one complete or near complete indigenous language left. Dozens of them have disappeared to such an extent that only place names remain and meanings for many of those are disputed or simply listed "unknown". Even the true etymology of the word Billabong is lost, though it is used daily by Murri, Koori and gubba alike to describe one of our most unique and important geographical features.

Australians proved to be quite adept at genocide. Not a national achievement to inspire much pride, is it?
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Earthbound Spirit on June 21, 2012, 05:35:53 PM
My country's treatment of its Native Americans is as shameful.

Personally, I'm glad Custer got wiped out.   Arrogant bastard.......
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on June 22, 2012, 08:03:00 AM
My country's treatment of its Native Americans is as shameful.

Personally, I'm glad Custer got wiped out.   Arrogant bastard.......

Agreed... at the time of the invasion of the Americas by European barbarians, the native culture was considerably more evolved... one of the reasons the Indians believed that white man would honor their treaties was because they were sealed with a sacred pipe... but to the whites, it was no more significant than a cigar after dinner... very sad.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Arnemetia on June 22, 2012, 10:44:57 AM
I just returned from a trip to Alaska.  One of our purposes for going was so hubby could participate in Celebration, which is a gathering of the clans to share knowledge.  Between the Russians and the U.S., they have lost a lot of their culture and are deperately trying to rebuild it.  So many traditions have been lost and many of the Elders cannot remember.  Those who can are doing their best to pass on their knowledge.  Language is being written for the first time and even being taught in classroom settings.  Hubby's mother only speaks a fraction of her own language because they were not allowed to speak it at the school they were forced to live at and attend.  Mom is 83 now and tries to pass on what she remembers of the family tree and traditions. 
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 22, 2012, 02:12:50 PM
Here right up until the 1970's Aboriginal kids who had been "stolen" - taken by the authorities into what was laughingly referred to as care, were beaten for speaking their own languages. They took thousands of children. It was a deliberate ploy - to break cultural ties. I know the same things happened in Canada. I expect it was a similar story in the US.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Bri on June 23, 2012, 07:43:22 AM
 Indians deserve more than just a little piece of land
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: dark magus on June 23, 2012, 08:55:52 AM
Indians deserve more than just a little piece of land

Do they? First let me qualify this by saying I too have native heritage. But what is being demanded today, many times, is just not reasonable.
 
Here in British Columbia, our provincial government has already given large tracks of land to the Native Nations. And cash settlements as well with money we really don't have to spend, increasing our provincial debt, pulling tax dollars away from Health care, education, care for seniors and the disabled.
Similar stories can be seen across Canada.
 
It goes to the addage, give an inch, they take a mile........
The city of Vancouver (as an example) is under dispute. There are native bands making claims that the land the city sits on is historically native land and they want title and rent from the current occupants. Every now and then, during a  construction excavation, some bone turn up dating back 4,000 years or more and the Indians come down and make a big ta do claiming it's a burial site from their people, when really there is n way to tell who's people these bones belonged to.
Truth is, the tribes along the BC coast were at one time very territorial and always at war with the next tribe up the beach. It could have just as easily been an old battle ground with those bone being the invaderes / losers left for the crows.
 
One band South of the city has been very successful as they have actually found artifacts that link their tribe to specific areas. They have claimed their sacred lands and the governments has bought out the existing farms and homes and "returned" these lands to the tribe a few years ago. Those sacred lands are now being developed for commercial use including an industrial park and a casino.....so much for being sacred. Not to over look the fact these lands were some of the best farm lands in the province now going under concreate.
 
I think we are going in the wrong direction. The Native peoples of Canada were defeated in a European expansion. Sometimes with guns sometimes just with superior numbers. Yes the Government needs to help them regain aspects of their past. Language, art, etc. Help them intigrate into society better. But the land is gone. Unless the "whiteman" is prepared to pack up and return to Europe, we need to stop trying to find ways to give them land and further the isolation of these people from the 21st century.
I know, people are going to say the government isn't doing a very good job as is and point to that band in Ontario last winter. But lets look at what's really happening. A band makes a claim for lands in central BC. The government gives it to them. They establish a community in the middle of nowhere, with no infrastructure, no jobs, limited access. Next thing they demand is government support. The chief and his people are sitting on free land , in a free home, and getting money to live in a place they wanted to be, then bitch and complain that they don't have schools or hospitals or any of the comforts that might be available in the city! This has been going on for a long time and really pisses me off. I wish the government were more like the Borg in matters of this type, you will be assimilated.....resistance is futile!
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Arnemetia on June 24, 2012, 08:38:04 AM
Here right up until the 1970's Aboriginal kids who had been "stolen" - taken by the authorities into what was laughingly referred to as care, were beaten for speaking their own languages. They took thousands of children. It was a deliberate ploy - to break cultural ties. I know the same things happened in Canada. I expect it was a similar story in the US.

You are correct.  Mom is still very passive and avoids any confrontation at all.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: marisol on June 24, 2012, 09:20:06 AM
I think there is very little that can be done to replace what was taken from my ancestors. We can't replace their way of life, or the lives lost. We can give them land, money, etc. but that does
not replace what was taken.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Khara on June 25, 2012, 07:33:32 AM
I don't consider it a fair defeat (as in a battle) when you torture and murder people in their beds or with blankets infested with disease that you gave under the umbrella of friendship. 

It may be different in Cananda, but in the US, the land was stolen and there really isn't an argument to be made that will ever justify the treatment of the native americans.  The US brought a gun to a knife fight and slaughtered the native americans like so many sheep.  Leaving their bodies to rot in the sun.  Entire tribal groups were massacred.  Under the explanation that they refused to move from the land they and their ancestors generations back had lived on was up for grabs to whoever had the most ammunition.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 25, 2012, 09:18:43 AM
I think you also need to understand that land for most indigenous peoples doesn't have the kind of monetary or commercial value it holds for Europeans. It's far more valuable than that. "Ownership" is a white man's word for what the people's relationship to the land is. In indigenous cultures, custodianship of the land is a sacred duty. A connection to and an occupation of the land is central to the spiritual life of both the individual and the community.

To say "oh the govt has to help them get back their art and culture and shit but they can't have the land -  its worth too much to us" shows a deep seated ignorance of the role which the land plays in all of these things.

You know, if my grandfather stole your grandfather's diamonds and gold and you managed to track me down and I still had them - I am pretty sure that the laws (here at least) would state that they had to be returned to you.

Land was stolen from the native peoples. That it was stolen at gunpoint and several hundred years ago doesn't make that any less of a theft.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on June 25, 2012, 03:48:59 PM
I think you also need to understand that land for most indigenous peoples doesn't have the kind of monetary or commercial value it holds for Europeans. It's far more valuable than that. "Ownership" is a white man's word for what the people's relationship to the land is. In indigenous cultures, custodianship of the land is a sacred duty. A connection to and an occupation of the land is central to the spiritual life of both the individual and the community.

To say "oh the govt has to help them get back their art and culture and shit but they can't have the land -  its worth too much to us" shows a deep seated ignorance of the role which the land plays in all of these things.

You know, if my grandfather stole your grandfather's diamonds and gold and you managed to track me down and I still had them - I am pretty sure that the laws (here at least) would state that they had to be returned to you.

Land was stolen from the native peoples. That it was stolen at gunpoint and several hundred years ago doesn't make that any less of a theft.

It's also important to understand that the People don't really believe they owned the land but that they are the caretakers of the land.  Land "ownership" is really a European concept, or at least a post Christian European concept. Many if not most pre-Christian Pagan societies believed in stewardship as opposed to "ownership" of land...
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 25, 2012, 04:03:13 PM
Yeah precisely. This notion of land as a commercial unit - it's a very Judeo Christian view of the thing. A corruption to my mind. How can we "own" any segment of the mother earth? How can she be ours to plunder at will? That's abhorrent.

I don't know what NA cultures believe in detail but I knew it was very much akin to the Aboroginal way of looking at the thing. Here the  people do not own the land. The land owns them. They belong to it. In fact my middle name, Myee means just that in Waradjuri - "I belong to this place".

So when you take a person from their land, you have taken them from the place that gives them their very existence. Here, to be buried out of country means that you can never make it back to your dreaming. Families will pauper themselves to transport a dead loved one back to their tribal lands for burial. It's that important. In past times, if a person died while they were following the dreaming tracks or songlines, their bodies would be burned and the bones lovingly carried, for months until they got back to country and could be laid there.

"We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love... and then we return home."

But the songline to your Dreaming is on your land - the place you come from. You can't make it back there from a strange place.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaqLw1CvPMk


"When we paint, whether it is on our bodies for ceremony or on bark or canvas for the market, we're not just painting for fun or profit, we're painting as we always have done to demonstrate our continuing link with our country and the rights and responsibilities we have to it."
GALARRWUY YUNUPINGU



Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: dark magus on June 25, 2012, 04:11:55 PM
Well then...you Americans should be love'n Obama.......
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/04/11/obama-moves-to-settle-41-tribal-trust-cases-for-1-billion-107735 (http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/04/11/obama-moves-to-settle-41-tribal-trust-cases-for-1-billion-107735)
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 25, 2012, 06:20:09 PM
The depth of the white man's disrespect for this attachment to the land can be demonstrated by one simple fact. It was 2008 before any Australian Federal Parliament did the traditional owners of the land in the ACT the courtesy of allowing them to perform a Welcome to Country.

This is a formal ceremony, inviting strangers to come and sit with the people who hold the custodianship of an area.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1JwyxNh3Ak

Why ought we be surprised by that. It was 1967 before Aboriginals were made citizens of their own nation.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Khara on June 26, 2012, 06:37:20 AM
Well then...you Americans should be love'n Obama.......
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/04/11/obama-moves-to-settle-41-tribal-trust-cases-for-1-billion-107735 (http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/04/11/obama-moves-to-settle-41-tribal-trust-cases-for-1-billion-107735)

Interesting list of tribes there.  Mainly western  and northern tribes other than the Chippewa who had a few eastern locations.  All in all the Sioux are racking up.  How nice for them.  I guess those who are holding out for a return of tribal lands aren't being offered shut the fvck up money.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Serpentium on June 26, 2012, 08:03:53 AM
The depth of the white man's disrespect for this attachment to the land can be demonstrated by one simple fact. It was 2008 before any Australian Federal Parliament did the traditional owners of the land in the ACT the courtesy of allowing them to perform a Welcome to Country.

This is a formal ceremony, inviting strangers to come and sit with the people who hold the custodianship of an area.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1JwyxNh3Ak (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1JwyxNh3Ak)

Why ought we be surprised by that. It was 1967 before Aboriginals were made citizens of their own nation.
That's not typical ''Whitey'  though, not anymore. I think it's more of an Australian thing. You lot seem to hanging on rather too hard to some of the worst ideals The Empire exported. (Along with some of the best, too) But it's 2112, not 1840, and in the outside, right way up world, things have moved on considerably.


As recently as this week, The Queen was rubbing shoulders with the  upper echelons of what used to be the Provisional IRA, (quite possibly the very man who ordered the hit on her Uncle, Louis Mountbatten)


If we still had the same nostalgic colonial mindset, he'd have been transported (along with all his Papist Rebel friends) long ago to some gods-forsaken sunbaked hellhole corner of The Empire, like Aust . . . . . . . . . ahh, right OK Skippy, point conceded.

(Need anymore "Ten Pound  Taffs" to help make Vaginika Gizzard feel at home?)   






 
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 26, 2012, 09:06:32 AM
That's not typical ''Whitey'  though, not anymore. I think it's more of an Australian thing. You lot seem to hanging on rather too hard to some of the worst ideals The Empire exported. (Along with some of the best, too) But it's 2112, not 1840, and in the outside, right way up world, things have moved on considerably.


As recently as this week, The Queen was rubbing shoulders with the  upper echelons of what used to be the Provisional IRA, (quite possibly the very man who ordered the hit on her Uncle, Louis Mountbatten)


If we still had the same nostalgic colonial mindset, he'd have been transported (along with all his Papist Rebel friends) long ago to some gods-forsaken sunbaked hellhole corner of The Empire, like Aust . . . . . . . . . ahh, right OK Skippy, point conceded.

(Need anymore "Ten Pound  Taffs" to help make Vaginika Gizzard feel at home?)

 ::)

Yes I know. I was making specific reference to the white man's attitude here.

I  keep telling you what an appalling place this is.

You are the one who seems to have trouble believing the depth of the racism which operates here. I am under no illusions whatsoever.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 26, 2012, 10:29:00 AM
You want to see a big joke , you should read our Equal Right Amendment . It should be the Unequal Right Amendments.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Khara on June 26, 2012, 10:30:02 AM
You want to see a big joke , you should read our Equal Right Amendment . It should be the Unequal Right Amendments How can we fvck you over today......

fixed that for ya!  ;)
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 26, 2012, 10:44:23 AM
Thanks for the fix .
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: marisol on June 28, 2012, 07:22:05 AM
I was hoping more for SE tribes.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 28, 2012, 11:43:35 AM
Lets give her all our support , I have a friend on the National Indian Council ; I'll see if she'll write a nasty letter to the Aussie government on the deplorable way the original peoples of the land are being treated.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 28, 2012, 07:40:10 PM
Please do. And if she agrees ask her to make special mention of the appalling situation which has been developing for the past 10 years which the government euphemistically refers to as "The Intervention" Whereby the welfare payments of all indigenous peoples in the Northern territory remote communities are garnishiered, based on the assumption that without this being done they will not feed their children - and where families are financially penalised for children not attending school. When in many cases the "schools" they are supposed to be attending have neither teachers, books nor chairs enough to accommodate the number of kids in the catchment area - nor available transport to them.

http://stoptheintervention.org/
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 28, 2012, 07:56:17 PM
Emailed Simone , well let you know what she says . I'll sent a nice letter to the Austrian Embassy protesting their abhorred treatment of your people .
If that doesn't work how about a revolution?.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 28, 2012, 09:00:50 PM
Emailed Simone , well let you know what she says . I'll sent a nice letter to the Austrian Embassy protesting their abhorred treatment of your people .
If that doesn't work how about a revolution?.

If you cancel the football season, make cricket illegal and put a 600% excise duty on beer you'll get Australians to stage a revolution. But apart from that, it's not an option.

 >:(
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 29, 2012, 10:45:07 AM
Hijack all the beer truck , blowup all the radio and tv stations . If you need instructors I know some fine gents from the IRA that aren't doing anything right now , they be more then happy to help.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Serpentium on June 29, 2012, 02:14:29 PM
Emailed Simone , well let you know what she says . I'll sent a nice letter to the Austrian Embassy protesting their abhorred treatment of your people .
If that doesn't work how about a revolution?.
You could try the Australian Embassy too
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on June 29, 2012, 02:24:39 PM
You could try the Australian Embassy too

They'll do you feck all good. Couldn't organise a root in a brothel that lot. The only time I ever resorted to them was in Thailand during one of the many abortive coups of the 80's and they were about as much use as mammary glands on a bull. The British took us out on their planes and billed the incompetent twats later.

I do hope they had the good sense to pad the account.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Khara on June 29, 2012, 02:29:39 PM
I'll be honest I don't think there are any Embassies, that do much of anything.  The ones in the US do nothing but grant diplomatic immunity.

I've, unfortunately, been a guest at a lot of US Embassies across the world and have yet to find one that does a damn thing besides party with the rich and famous of whatever country they are in.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: oldghost on June 29, 2012, 04:00:53 PM
Probably get better responce from the Austrian government.
Time for and uprising .
 
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on September 01, 2012, 09:11:30 AM
An NA friend of mine just posted this on his Facebook page and it reminded me of this thread, so I thought to put it here, because it's lovely.


"All the things of the universe are joined with you who smoke the pipe…
all send their voices to Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit…
when you pray with this pipe, you pray for and with everything."

Heȟáka Sápa "Black Elk" (1863-1950)
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on September 04, 2012, 01:03:43 PM
An NA friend of mine just posted this on his Facebook page and it reminded me of this thread, so I thought to put it here, because it's lovely.


"All the things of the universe are joined with you who smoke the pipe…
all send their voices to Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit…
when you pray with this pipe, you pray for and with everything."

Heȟáka Sápa "Black Elk" (1863-1950)

Mitakuye oyasin
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on September 04, 2012, 02:47:42 PM
An NA friend of mine just posted this on his Facebook page and it reminded me of this thread, so I thought to put it here, because it's lovely.


"All the things of the universe are joined with you who smoke the pipe…
all send their voices to Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit…
when you pray with this pipe, you pray for and with everything."

Heȟáka Sápa "Black Elk" (1863-1950)

Mitakuye oyasin

ooh...what does that mean?
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on September 04, 2012, 04:30:59 PM
An NA friend of mine just posted this on his Facebook page and it reminded me of this thread, so I thought to put it here, because it's lovely.


"All the things of the universe are joined with you who smoke the pipe…
all send their voices to Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit…
when you pray with this pipe, you pray for and with everything."

Heȟáka Sápa "Black Elk" (1863-1950)

Mitakuye oyasin

ooh...what does that mean?

It's a Lakota prayer, or a reference to one.  Literally it means, "for all my relations..." but basically it's a term for the universal connectivity of all things.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Scorched Eartha on September 04, 2012, 04:57:53 PM
Thank you.

I liked the look of the words on the page and there was something I liked about the way they felt in my mouth while I said them that was weirdly satisfying.

I am going to remember that.....Mitakuye oyasin. That's a fine sentiment.
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on September 05, 2012, 11:02:11 AM
Thank you.

I liked the look of the words on the page and there was something I liked about the way they felt in my mouth while I said them that was weirdly satisfying.

I am going to remember that.....Mitakuye oyasin. That's a fine sentiment.

It's similar to the Hindi work "namaste", which is also a statement of universal connection of all things...
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: CelticWanderer on May 09, 2015, 08:32:03 AM
I would like to address something here, and that is the use of the term "white man" in regards to being the sole culprits behind the treatment of Natives. I have encountered firsthand disdain for Natives from both blacks and Hispanics, both of which have done their part to try and rid the area they chose to live of Natives. Not every white man that came here tried to abolish to take anything from them or end their culture. Many white men who went to the mountains to get away from a so called civilized society married and took the mantle of the peoples they were living with. I can speak from first hand knowledge of this even in todays time, my wife is an Oglala Lakota and I am accepted as one of the family. So please do not lump all "white men" as being evil or responsible for the atrocities that have come upon the Native Peoples. Peace to all of you :)
Title: Re: Chanupa Wakan: the Sacred Pipe
Post by: Firesong on May 11, 2015, 11:30:54 PM
What you say makes a great deal of sense.  There are many of all races with a chip on their shoulder.  The problem comes when non-Indians adapt and practice sacred ceremonies for fun and profit.