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Author Topic: Wiccaning  (Read 4906 times)

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edens garden

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Wiccaning
« on: February 02, 2011, 07:55:40 PM »

I have seen this term referenced fairly often. I was wondering what you can tell me about Wiccanings. Do you have experience with them? Have you performed one? Planned one? I'll admit I don't know too much about them, other than that they are somewhat similar to Baptisms.
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dark magus

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2011, 08:03:16 PM »

It's the term given to a christening of a baby
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lilpnkbnny

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2011, 09:29:18 PM »

ive only heard about it on Charmed.....LOL!
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edens garden

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2011, 09:38:38 PM »

LPB, you just summed up what I was avoiding saying! The best reference I have on what one should be like is pretty glowing orbs and Grams popping back from the dead! Pretty sure I don't have a long line of witches past to attend my Godsons wiccaning...
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lilpnkbnny

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2011, 09:44:02 PM »

I think a child should choose their own way so christianings and wiccanings are both of limits to me. A few of my children have chosen baptism but I talked long and hard with the reverands that came to tell me it was time. I told them NO. when it was time, my child would let them know. I'm all for a child following their way, but I don't take guilt and brainwashing lightly.
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Hjolmaer

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2011, 03:00:23 AM »

I think a child should choose their own way so christianings and wiccanings are both of limits to me. A few of my children have chosen baptism but I talked long and hard with the reverands that came to tell me it was time. I told them NO. when it was time, my child would let them know. I'm all for a child following their way, but I don't take guilt and brainwashing lightly.


In truth, a wiccaning does not influence the child at all.  Or at the very least, it's not supposed to.  Ideally a wiccaning is performed when the child is still very young (new-born phase, or shortly thereafter).

Unlike a baptism/christening (both from the Abrahamic paths, as we currently understand them), the wiccaning does not "promise" the child to any god/gods or path.  It merely asks the gods the parents follow/worship to watch over and protect the child until said child finds his/her own path, as well as being a sort of "formal introduction to the pagan community" as it were.
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FireWillow

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2011, 05:27:02 AM »


In truth, a wiccaning does not influence the child at all.  Or at the very least, it's not supposed to.  Ideally a wiccaning is performed when the child is still very young (new-born phase, or shortly thereafter).

Unlike a baptism/christening (both from the Abrahamic paths, as we currently understand them), the wiccaning does not "promise" the child to any god/gods or path.  It merely asks the gods the parents follow/worship to watch over and protect the child until said child finds his/her own path, as well as being a sort of "formal introduction to the pagan community" as it were.

Precisely!

I will add that the only was one can become a Wiccan is through self-dedication or initiation.  A Wiccaning does not, in any way, shape, of form, make a child a Wiccan.
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C_A

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2011, 06:28:39 AM »

+10. H & FW
I have performed several. 
What do you need to know?
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edens garden

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2011, 07:53:16 AM »

I'm curious what people tend to include in a wiccaning. I am most likely planning one for my godson when he moves out here with my sister, and am looking for ideas. I'd love to hear any ideas or experiences you might have!
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In the magic of the northern woods I learn
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dark magus

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2011, 09:43:33 AM »

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FireWillow

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2011, 09:53:47 AM »

One of Uncle Bucky's rites from a book that is my library.

Click here, because the link itself evidently messes up the frame in some browsers (which is why I use Firefox).
« Last Edit: February 09, 2011, 10:35:28 AM by FireWillow »
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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2011, 11:27:12 AM »

Wiccanings are like naming ceremonies.  Basically the idea is to introduce the child to the community and to the powers that be and ask that they be watched over until they choose their own path.

Both of my boys have had naming ceremonies.  They were greeted by the people invited, introduced to the powers that be and anointed with seawater and red earth.  I think I have it up...

Here it is:

A naming ceremony of some type is common to most societies. It is a ceremony where a new born is introduced to his/her community as well as to the spirit world. It is an important ceremony for the family and friends that are involved even if it does not mean much to the infant at this point in time. It makes the newborn a real and concrete member of the community. This is one reason why christenings are such a large social event among many Christians. Even if you plan to let your child pick his/her own faith when they grow up, you should still consider this ceremony. It is very important socially, not to mention that it brings the infant to the attention of the powers that be, whatever he/she will call them later, during one of the most vulnerable times of their life.

Naming ceremonies are normally done no sooner than one week after birth (to allow for recovery of both baby and mother from the birth) and normally no longer than a couple of months after the birth (if more time passes the infant is already a part of the community and has probably already been called to the attention of the spirit world in some way so it becomes a rather moot point). The ceremony is best done at sunrise or at least in the morning and is best if done during a full or waxing moon.

New parents should invite family and friends that they feel will be close during the child?s life. A naming ceremony can be simple and non-denominational enough that those of other faiths should feel comfortable attending (unless of course they want the baby to get baptized, but that?s another story).

Ask each guest to bring a gift for the child, something simple that symbolizes an attribute or virtue they hope the child will grow to have (like an image of a dove to symbolize peace). Make sure they understand this is NOT like a baby shower. These gifts will be kept in a box until the child comes of age (either at the start of puberty or when they leave home whichever the parents prefer). Have them attach their name and a word or two that describes the gift to the gift with a bit of ribbon or yarn. For example, "Aunt Sally hopes you will have peace in your life." The mother and father, or godparents or grandparents if the parents are overwhelmed with the new baby, should find and decorate a box to use for the ceremony and to store the gifts in till they are given to the child when they come of age.

For this ceremony the mother and father can act as the officiator/priest/priestess, or if they prefer someone else can officiate. For the ceremony the child should be dressed in white and well fed and changed before hand. You might want to refrain from calling the child by its given name until they are names in the actual ceremony.

You can if you want open a circle like you would for any ritual if the guests will be conducive. If not just do a very simple circle mentally right before the start of the ceremony.

Officiator: "Will the Mother of the infant please bring the child forward!"

Mother walks up to the Officiator (with husband if applicable) and then turns to face the guests.

Officiator (standing behind Mother): "Family, friends and all the positive powers of the universe (or any particular deities you prefer), I ask you to look upon this infant."

At this point if the child is going along with the entire process it would be good to lift him/her up towards the heavens. (It also lets the people in back see more of the ceremony.)

Officiator: "He/She is the newest member of our family. He/She will grow strong and healthy surrounded by our love and nurturing."

You can let the baby down now. (grin)

Officiator: For him/her to be a part of our lives we must have a name by which to call him/her."

Mother turns to Officiator

Officiator: "What is this child to be named?"

Father (or Mother is you prefer): "This child is to be named ___________"

Officiator says the child?s name loud enough for all to hear. Then says "Greetings, __________, and welcome to our hearts and homes." If the Officiator is a friend or family member (other than mom or dad) now is when they should present their gift to the child saying, "I bring you "Peace" and hope you will find it in your life," and placing the gift in the box. (That last part does not have to be loud enough for the audience to hear.)

Mother turns back around to face the group. Then the Officiator will address the audience, "Does anyone (or anyone else if the Officiator has given the child a gift) have a gift to bless ______________ with?"

Someone will have been told ahead of time what to do (godparents or grandparents are a good call) and will start a line coming up one by one to ooh and ahh over the baby and give it their gifts using the same general terminology the Officiator did. Prewarning people and explaining the ceremony ahead of time, even if it is just before the ceremony, will help this part a lot!

When everyone has given their gifts the Officiator will call forward the godparents, if any. "Would _______ and ________ please step forward?"

Once they are in the front facing the Officiator and Mother, Father and newly named child the Officiator will continue, "______(Father) and _______(Mother) love you dearly and value your morals and believe that you each have much you can teach _________(child). They would ask that you serve as the teachers and guardians of _______(child) in the event that they are no longer able to. Will you accept this responsibility and honor?" (Please make sure they will say yes ahead of time!!!!)

They should respond in unison, "We would be honored to." Then hugs from the Mother and Father would be in order.

Finally the Officiator should close the ceremony with, "Thank you all for coming here today and meeting the newest member of our family and community. Go well and Stay well."

Then close the circle or if you did it mentally, just let it go.
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Lady Brigid

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2011, 09:19:05 PM »

When EG originally called me and asked if I would be ok with doing a wiccaning for my son, her godson, I was a little skeptical because I am so new to this path and I'm still finding my way. I'm very much a believer that children should be able to grow and become their own people and choose the path they desire. I love all the replies to EG's post and I'm definitely going to be participating in a wiccanning for my little Munchkin!
Thank you all so much for the info!
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Kypress

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2011, 06:20:47 PM »

My reply is towards the comment about Christian dedications...
We let my grandfather "dedicate" Monkey.  I wanted Monkey to find her own path.  I want her to understand other beliefs and make her own decision, not just "I'm a Christian because my entire family is and anything NOT Christian is 'bad'."  The Christian "dedication" isn't supposed to be a baptism.  It's the parents/family saying that they promise to raise the child Christian.  I'm definitely not going to let her be baptized unless that is definitely what she wants.  She'll have to be able to explain to me and give me a good reason, not a script.
I finally was baptized December 20th (was dedicated as an infant), and I really only did it to shut my mom and the Church up.  Yes, I feel I am Christian, but I wasn't ready for a baptism.  And I ended up slipping as the pastor was bringing me back up out of the water and fell back under and almost drowned.  I was also his first baptism indoors (they normally go camping and due the group baptism in the river).
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Hjolmaer

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Re: Wiccaning
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2011, 06:25:01 PM »

Isn't part of the purpose of a baptism to dedicate the child to the God of Abraham?  And promise said God to raise the child "Christian"?  I could be wrong, but that's always the understanding of a baptism I've had.  It's how it was explained to me some years ago.

Raising a child in a given religion will give the child an ingrained pre-disposition either strongly toward, or strongly against, said religion.
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