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Author Topic: The Dynion Mwyn  (Read 4695 times)

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Alchymist

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Re: The Dynion Mwyn
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2014, 02:44:43 PM »

Genealogy: if carried to its entirely logical and mathematical extreme, leads to a surprising - but, if you think about it, rather obvious - conclusion.

Consider: each of us has two biological parents, four grandparents, 8 great-grandparents, 16 great-great-grandparents ...... and so it goes, doubling with every generation.

Let's be conservative, and say an average generation is about 25 years; so four generations per century. Eight generations, 200 years: 256 ancestors. Twelve generations, 300 years: 4096 ancestors.

So how many generations would it take, do you think, and how many years, for the number of your possible ancestors to exceed the entire population of the planet? A hundred generations, or 2500 years? Two hundred, or 5000 years?

Actually, 28. Only 700 years.

28 generations ago, the number of your possible ancestors was 268,435,456. The population of the whole planet was probably around 200 million.

The fourteenth century. Feudalism still ruled; the majority of the population were peasants and serfs, tied to the land. Bubonic plague - the Black Death. The Hundred Years War. The destruction of the Templars. The beginnings of the witch persecutions in Europe. Not a good time to be living in Europe. But, for those of us of European ancestry, probably everyone living at that time - peasants, artisans, soldiers, outlaws, criminals, merchants, the aristocracy, even royalty - even priests, even monks and nuns - English, Welsh, Scottish, French, Scandinavians, Spanish, Italians - were, if not our direct ancestors, at least related to us in some way.

So if genealogy counts for anything - we're all Welsh, all Vikings, all Picts, all ..... Atlanteans??.....; all Royalty, all Aristocracy, all peasants, adventurers, clerks, alchemists, sheep-stealers, cattle-rustlers, rebels, witches, inquisitors.......

And, perhaps, all of us carry the blood of the Merovingians - and, perhaps, if certain legends are to be believed - the blood of Jesus Christ and Mary Magdalene.....

Alchymist.
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Firesong

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Re: The Dynion Mwyn
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2014, 10:58:28 AM »

Genealogy: if carried to its entirely logical and mathematical extreme, leads to a surprising - but, if you think about it, rather obvious - conclusion.

Consider: each of us has two biological parents, four grandparents, 8 great-grandparents, 16 great-great-grandparents ...... and so it goes, doubling with every generation.

Let's be conservative, and say an average generation is about 25 years; so four generations per century. Eight generations, 200 years: 256 ancestors. Twelve generations, 300 years: 4096 ancestors.

So how many generations would it take, do you think, and how many years, for the number of your possible ancestors to exceed the entire population of the planet? A hundred generations, or 2500 years? Two hundred, or 5000 years?

Actually, 28. Only 700 years.

28 generations ago, the number of your possible ancestors was 268,435,456. The population of the whole planet was probably around 200 million.

The fourteenth century. Feudalism still ruled; the majority of the population were peasants and serfs, tied to the land. Bubonic plague - the Black Death. The Hundred Years War. The destruction of the Templars. The beginnings of the witch persecutions in Europe. Not a good time to be living in Europe. But, for those of us of European ancestry, probably everyone living at that time - peasants, artisans, soldiers, outlaws, criminals, merchants, the aristocracy, even royalty - even priests, even monks and nuns - English, Welsh, Scottish, French, Scandinavians, Spanish, Italians - were, if not our direct ancestors, at least related to us in some way.

So if genealogy counts for anything - we're all Welsh, all Vikings, all Picts, all ..... Atlanteans??.....; all Royalty, all Aristocracy, all peasants, adventurers, clerks, alchemists, sheep-stealers, cattle-rustlers, rebels, witches, inquisitors.......

And, perhaps, all of us carry the blood of the Merovingians - and, perhaps, if certain legends are to be believed - the blood of Jesus Christ and Mary Magdalene.....

Alchymist.

IF we follow that vein back to it's logical beginning, according to some modern anthropologists, we are all Africans...

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Kuerden D˙ghlas

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Re: The Dynion Mwyn
« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2015, 11:25:03 AM »

So they state they are drawing from Victor Anderson's Feri Tradition as well as Druid lore and various British witchcraft traditions?

The more eclectic "Feri Tradition" that ascribes the maiden aspect of the Goddess to Nimue, yes.

The Welsh Faerie Witchcraft expounded by Rhuddlwm Gawr, Mike Nichols, et al, no.

I know Mike Nichols; he does not practice so-called "Welsh Faerie." He is a Welsh Traditionalist, yes (with overtones of Wicca), but not Faerie. And he has no connections to the group in question.
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Kuerden D˙ghlas

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Re: The Dynion Mwyn
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2015, 01:24:20 PM »

The following quote box is from this thread in the Introduction forum:

Wricker Dreadtemper, I nosed around a bit, and I have to tell you The Dynion Mwyn Tradition of Witchcraft looks to me like it was made up about 10 minutes ago by a couple of high school kids. Just for starters, they have Nimue as a Corn Queen? Corn is a New World food, not Welsh, and Nimue was a witch not a goddess. That's just one example and it doesn't bode well. [...]

....

However, concerning Nimue's status as Goddess (or an aspect of feminine divinity), I can't speak to your source(s), but  ...
A cursory google search led me to the article, Some Things I Know About Nimue (by Valerie Walker, originally published in Witch Eye Magazine, 2004).

An excerpt:

"Strangely enough, Nimue, the Maiden aspect of the Triple Goddess, doesn't get written about very much by Feris, especially when contrasted with her opposite number (and occasional Twin) the Blue God. ... Another reason might be that the Maiden is closer to the Crone than to the Mother: in the seasonal cycle, the Crone becomes the Maiden in the spring, and in many myths (e.g., that of Kore/Persephone) the Maiden goes to the Underworld to encounter the Crone and become transformed."

....

Also, despite the potentially misleading "F(a)eri(e)" designation, according to their official website, that's an American tradition of witchcraft with no apparent affiliation with the Dynion Mwyn.

There is no single "official" website. Ours, Lilith's Lantern, is just as "official" and recognized within the community, as we're direct initiates and participated in the Andersons' final coven.

....

As to Nimue, well, she was many things.  A G-ddess?  No.  People, (especially "auteurs"), come up with stuff sometimes, though, don't they?  I mean, there are those who worship the Virgin Mary, Helen of Troy, Morgan La Fey and even, (this is true...happened back when I facilitated an interfaith discussion group), Pocahontas.  None of the sisters were G-desses.

What happens is, IMNHO, people get all caught up in McWicca and run off the deep end.  Many of them felt very secure during the fast-paced rise of neo-paganism at the tail end of the last century, thinking that no one would notice.  Hey, even Murray and Leland did it...look where it got them.  Who, (over the age of, say, twenty?) feels that J.K. Rowling or $ilver Ravingwoot is an authority?

So they state they are drawing from Victor Anderson's Feri Tradition as well as Druid lore and various British witchcraft traditions?

The more eclectic "Feri Tradition" that ascribes the maiden aspect of the Goddess to Nimue, yes.

I should like to point out that Melusine is not a "goddess" but a local water spirit or fairy, yet her name figures prominently in the Goddess litany in The Charge. Anyway, there are goddesses who are also depicted as "witches" in folklore. And what's with pairing Aradia, an Italian goddess from Leland's dubious "gospel," with a Celtic underworld god, Cernunnos? That's not eclectic? When looking for things to ridicule, one can point at a number of different groups. Just sayin'.

[My sources on Melusine include the Melusine entry at pantheon.org, also Wiki.]

Since I'm not of any of those traditions I may not have the real scoop.  As an outsider some things don't add up to me, but I'll wait for some more input.  Keep us posted on your studies, and good fortune.

Nimue is indeed the outer court name used for the Maiden aspect of the Triple Goddess within the Anderson Craft Tradition. (Mari is the outer court name for the Great Mother in Faery.) Victor Anderson was highly inspired and influenced by Robert Graves, from whom he borrowed the outer (i.e., nonsecret) names. But the Andersons' Nimue is not the Nimue of Arthurian legend. Although the name's the same, the lore is unique to Anderson Craft, a living oral tradition. It is not "McWicca."

Victor wrote several poems to the Triple Goddess in his classic book of Pagan poetry, Thorns of the Blood Rose, such as "Song of Mari" (as recorded by Gwydion Pendderwen and Pandaemoneon), "Mari of the Moon," and in the sequel, Lilith's Garden, in "Mother of All Living" and other poems. Space and time do not permit me to excerpt more than a few that mention Nimue:

Whether you come as Nimue,
Slender maiden with the silver bow;
Or Mari, white moon who shines for all,
Illuminating the hearts of men;
Or Anna of the forbidden mysteries,
Whose black majesty, crowned with blue suns,
Reigns supreme in boundless night.

(excerpted from "Prayer for Sexual Purification" by Victor H. Anderson in Thorns of the Blood Rose)

And this one:

I heard an old woman say,
I have been a widow seven years.
My husband was killed while hunting deer
In the time of Mari the silent.
...
But when they told me, I did not weep,
For it was the holy time
Of the all-fruitful Bride and Mother
Whose sign is the full white moon.

Now I bless the young lovers
Who lie panting under the new moon.
Her horns have pricked them between the thighs,
Injecting their blood with honey
In the time of Nimue the Maiden.
...
For it is the holy time
When the Goddess pursues her lover
Whose sign is the morning star.

Now that I am growing old,
I shall not make myself a husband
...
For it is appointed to me
To sit at the council with the elders
To gaze into the dark waters,
In the aweful, holy time
Of Anna the Mother of wisdom
Whose sign is the waning moon.

(excerpted from "The Pictish Priestess" by Victor H. Anderson in Thorns of the Blood Rose)

And:

Like sweet wine and bitter myrrh
On Nimue's altar, blest with prayer,
I poured my boundless love for her
Into the chalice waiting there.

(excerpted from "Love's First Bloom" by Victor H. Anderson in Lilith's Garden)

More info on the Faery Triple Goddess can be found in The Heart of the Initiate by Victor and Cora Anderson, and The Spiral Dance by Starhawk.
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"Witchcraft fulfills a need in me to know that harmony can be created from discord."--Sybil Leek
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